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Psychosis

EEG resting-state connectivity and psychosis: Dopaminergic influences

Most brain functions depend on the connectivity between cerebral regions and their organization into networks. Studies have associated psychotic disorders with connectivity disturbances. In addition, changes in dopaminergic activity and brain connectivity are considered to be a core neurophysiological characteristic of psychotic disorders.
The project focuses on the relationships between medication-induced changes in dopaminergic activity and brain connectivity. It uses electroencephalography (EEG) to assess how dopaminergic agents affect the fast dynamics of brain networks.

Our group uses electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate the following:

  • The influence of dopaminergic agents on resting-state brain connectivity in healthy participants and in patients with psychotic disorders
  • Prediction of psychotic transitions in patients with increased psychosis risk based on EEG connectivity patterns and resting-state EEG microstates

Results are expected to be valuable in informing the development of new treatment methods for patients with psychotic disorders.

 

PEOPLE

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PD Dr. med. Christina Andreou PhD

Affiliated group leader

Info

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Renate de Bock

PhD student

Info

CONTACT

Renate de Bock

Department of Psychiatry (UPK) Basel

Wilhelm Klein Strasse 27
4012 Basel
Switzerland

e-mail: dopaminstudie@clutterupk.ch

 

COLLABORATION

  • Prof. Dr. med. Christoph Mulert, Centre for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen
  • Dr. Guido Nolte, Institute of Neuropsychology und Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
  • Prof. Astero Provata, National Center for Scientific Research “Dimokritos”, Athens, Greece